Ultima Final Fantasy | The Ultimate Final Fantasy Podcast

This time we discuss the design, music, legacy, and ranking of Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn. We discuss how we felt about the toned down anime elements of the character designs. We talk about the look of the areas, and praise the added number of NPC character models. We move on to discuss the musical score. We were quite impressed with the score, composed mainly by Masayoshi Soken. Only a few pieces composed by Nobou Uematsu survived the relaunch process. Once we've sufficiently blown the score, we discuss the legacy of the game. It will forever live in infamy due to it's initial 1.0 release, but much of it was revitalized by the re release. We discuss the game's place in the series, as well as it's place among other MMORPG's. We answer a few questions, and move on to our recap. We then place it forever in the ranking alongside it's 13 other brethren before it. Enjoy!

REMIXES:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=871j8LtqrtY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4yD8VUvEcQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTOPBvbKWFE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lc3k89vMOIE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MDAO1UwqFnc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PA0tS_0CzrE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=arplRYwHy_o

Direct download: UFF_84_FF14_Part2_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, we discuss the final numbered game in the series, Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn. We invited Banedrom, Bill Martigan, Emilee Mentos, and Anthony Walker onto the episode. These guys were extremely helpful during our playthrough of the game. We do a quick rundown of the games storyline, from the death of our fellow Scions of the Seventh Dawn, to the invasion of the Garlean base to rescue Minfilia and company. Once we do a rundown of the story, we move on to discuss the most important element of an MMORPG, the gameplay. We discuss the importance of fates, levequests, dungeons, primals, hunting logs, etc. We move on to talk about the multiplayer aspect of the game, from the primal fights, to the group dungeons. We offer a little criticism for the lack of multiplayer elements to the games main story missions, and specific class quests. Join us next time for our discussion of the design, music, legacy and overall statements for the games 2.0 storyline.

 

 

REMIXES:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=871j8LtqrtY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4yD8VUvEcQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTOPBvbKWFE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lc3k89vMOIE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MDAO1UwqFnc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PA0tS_0CzrE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=arplRYwHy_o

Direct download: UFF_83_FF14_Part1_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, Kaleb and Joe cover the Final Fantasy VII remakes Gameplay trailer. This, of course, came out shortly after last weeks early episode. They discuss their feelings on the battle system, and talk about the episodic approach to the release, and how Midgar, the most boring portion of Final Fantasy VII, would be a terrible beginning portion. We then move on to discuss the release of the PS4 port to Final Fantasy VII. We discuss the excellent theme that came with the game, and touch on the cheats. These cheats, interestingly, do not disable the game's trophies. We then move on to answer user submitted questions. Enjoy the episode!

 

REMIX - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=60SKsZukXk0

Direct download: UFF_82_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, we read part four of Joe's Epic Enjoy!

History of Square-Enix - Part 4: The Golden age of the 2D RPG

 

Enix could have floated on Dragon Quest V mega-release for the next 10 years, but they were well on their way with publishing multiple I.P.’s for the rest of the early 90’s., although this wasn’t without a few setbacks.

 

Enix released “The 7th Saga” in 1992, which had both mediocre reviews, as well as middling sales, and King Arthur and the Knights of Justice was apparently a hunk of Junk.

 

And in 1993, Enix released E.V.O: Search for Eden (A prehistoric RPG filled with dinosaurs) to similar results as the 7th Saga.

 

Square, however, was on top of the world. Secret of Mana in 1992 would go on to sell 1.83 million copies worldwide. It was praised as for it’s gameplay, music, and graphics, and would later be called “one of the high points of the 16 bit era” by Edge Magazine, as well as one of the greatest games of all time by famitsu, Nintendo Power, and IGN.

 

Although not nearly as well regarded, Square released Romancing Saga 2 to similar commercial results.

 

These games would kick off the golden age of 2 Dimensional JRPG’s.

 

Enix, in this SNES era, released a slew of games from ‘93 to ‘95, mostly in Japan due to the middling sales of Dragon Quest.

 

One of these was puzzle filled action RPG called “Brain Lord”, which was well reviewed, though didn’t exactly set the world on fire.

 

“Robotrek” would follow: a sci-fi precursor to pokemon in a sci-fi universe, that unfortunately tanked on released.

 

Terranigma”, which told the story of a boy named “Ark” trying to resurrect Earth, would later be hailed as a forgotten classic, but went nowhere near Square’s sales at 200,000 copies.

 

An RPG/Sim/War game called Ogre Battle (one of Enix’s most important games) was released to rave reviews, and would set the stage for it’s more famous sequel: Tactics Ogre.

 

Little is known about Enix’s game “Jyutei Senki”, except that it was only ever released in Japan, and that it’s a science fiction RPG game. “Mystic Ark” was another little-known RPG game put out by Enix, although it was successful enough to spawn a playstation sequel in 1999.

 

The biggest game of 1995 (Sorry Square) was Dragon Quest 6. It sold a whopping 3.2 Million copies, and this was only in Japan!

 

By this time Enix had given up on selling games outside of Japan, and before 1996’s game “Star Ocean” was released, they had closed their offices in North America. The game did alright for itself, selling about as much as “Terranigma” did before it, but as with a couple of these games it’s now looked upon as a forgotten gem in the west, Nintendo Life eventually praising it as one of the best-looking games on the Super Nintendo.

 

In contrast, Square was doing quite well in North America, while still doing good business in Japan. For Square, almost everything they touched turned to gold.

 

In 1994, Square would release one of it’s most well known RPG classics, “Breath of Fire” to good reviews and financial success.

 

But that was nothing compared to Final Fantasy VI, now seen as one of the greatest games of all time by most sources, eventually selling almost 4 million copies worldwide. That game is f--king awesome.

 

Last in ‘94, the forgotten game “Live a Live” would also be followed by another big success in early ‘95: “Front Mission” a sci-fi tacticle RPG game would sell half a million copies in the first week of release.

 

That same year we would see what some have called “The greatest RPG game of all time”, Chrono Trigger, a ground-breaking (I think, I haven't played it) RPG praised for it’s gameplay and non-linear story filled with optional endings that have kept people coming back to the game over and over for the last 20 years.

 

Square would round of 1995 with hits that included the 3rd mana game, Secret of Evermore, and Romancing Saga 3.

 

Square was on a role. Kazushige Nojima would direct a game called “Bahamut Lagoon” in 1996, and they’d follow that up with the famous and well-regarded Super Mario RPG.

 

By the end of 1996 Square was setting it’s sights on the 3rd dimension, and it’s last 2 games on the SNES: “Treasure of the Rudras” and “Treasure Hunter G”, would be overshadowed by the new consoles that were gaining some steam: Sony’s Playstation and the Nintendo 64.

REMIX - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dgw1mfvBI8I

Direct download: UFF_81_Sqaurep4_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week,  Kaleb and Joe tackle the remaining cutscenes in Final Fantasy XIV 1.0. This time, we discuss the empire's plan to use Meteo to wreak destruction upon Eorzia. We discuss the similarities in the Garuda primal, and also discuss how it leads directly into A Realm Reborn. We also discuss where we are in Final Fantasy XIV A Realm Reborn, and move on to answer a few tough questions including what games we've beaten by the skin of our teeth, and what we would feel about a possible Final Fantasy X sequel or prequel. Enjoy the grind!

Direct download: UFF_80_1-0part2_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, we listen to a review of Crystal Defenders. This game takes place in the world of Ivalice. Once we finish up listening to the well put together, and drop heavy hilarity, we move on to discuss the influx in news regarding the Dissidia arcade game. Squall, Cloud, Bartz, Terra, Cecil, Tidus, and Zidane have all been added to the games roster. We then touch on Final Fantasy Explorers and their jobs, and finish up with the announcement that Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII is coming to Steam in December. We then move on to listen to some questions from our Skype line. Enjoy the episode!

 

REMIX- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WNJyqlFrLiI

Direct download: UFF_79_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, we discuss the cutscenes from the 1.0 version of Final Fantasy XIV. We watched a video of all the cutscenes before hand, and discussed the differences between 1.0 and 2.0. We also ran through the story line, and discussed the events thereof. We also discuss the Final Fantasy XI crossover event in Final Fantasy XIV. We also answer some questions from the forums. Enjoy the grind!

Direct download: UFF_14_1point0Part1_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, we discuss what staples in the Final Fantasy series we feel are necessary in the fifteenth installment. We cover the need for cactaur, moogles, chocobos, hunts, and overall a good story. It's also important to us that the game is enjoyable; obviously. We also discuss a news piece about Nobou Uematsu not composing anything for the Final Fantasy VII remake. Enjoy the episode!

 

 

REMIX: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wBASm1nugc0

Direct download: ffxvwants_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, Kaleb gives a rundown on the lore behind a few of the weapons from the Final Fantasy series. We discuss Masamune, who is revered as the greatest swordsman in the history of Japan. We then touch base with Ragnarok, which is essentially the Norse version of the rapture. It involves the destruction of the world, and results in only one man and one woman left. We then move on to answer a few user submitted questions, and talk a little bit about our progress in Final Fantasy XIV. Enjoy the grind.

 

REMIX

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LaAhtI1_HU8

Direct download: UFF_76_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, Joe and Kaleb discuss the similarities between passages from Joseph Campbell's Hero with a Thousand Faces. We talk about our progress within Final Fantasy XIV, and discuss the All Saints Wake quest announcement. We also touch on breaking the show up into different seasons. We ask you listeners to let us know what Final Fantasy that should have been we should play in between XIV and The After years. Enjoy the episode!

Direct download: uffepisode75_mixdown1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

Finally! Thank you so much to our Patreon Donors!

Direct download: melodiesoflife.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:02am MST

Join us for an even bigger, girthier part two!

As we know, Final Fantasy XIII is the start of the Fabula Nova Crystallis collection of Final Fantasy games, and was the first game Square used their internally developed Crystal Tools game engine with. This tool was created to further unify the game’s development, and bring the originally PlayStation 3 exclusive to the Xbox 360 and Wii consoles. This system was conceived by the success of the Final Fantasy VII Tech Demo, which also spurred Square Enix to release Final Fantasy XIII on the PlayStation 3, instead of the originally planned release on Playstation 2.

 

The game received received mostly positive reviews from video game publications, praising the graphics, presentation, and battle system. The story received mixed reviews, but the linearity would be the centerpiece of most criticisms for Final Fantasy XIII, especially when compared to the rest of the series.

 

Development for Final Fantasy XIII began in 2004, just after the Release of Final Fantasy X-2 International + Last Mission in Japan. Director Motomu Toriyama and Kazushige Nojima conceived ideas for the stories plotline over the first year. It was Nojima that thought up the crystal mythology that is the basis of the series, and the roles of the fal’Cie and l’Cie. Toriyama then created the story around the mythology. His goal was to show the characters at the mercy of a predetermined, unjust fate. He also wanted to create a group who belonged together, but clashed heavily. To go about this, they designed each of the sory’s thirteen chapters to focus on different members of the party. The structure of the narrative started to come together in 2006, when Daisuke Watanabe joined the team. Watanabe, as you may recall, filled in for Matsuno left the Final Fantasy XII development team due to sickness. Watanabe was given a rough outline of the first eight chapters, including necessary scenes that had to stay, and was told to strengthen Toriyama’s script. An example of what this entailed, is he would get a document that simply said “Snow and Hope reconcile”, and would decide how the scene would play out, and write his scenario accordingly. Watanabe also did some adjusting for characters. He felt that Lightning shouldn’t be a reliable and calm leader, and went with the more irritable, enraged Lightning we know. This was done to capture the confusion and unease that the characters no doubt would feel in light of their situations. Toriyama felt that the Sazh suicide scene was too dark, so elements such as the Chocobo chick helped maintain a good balance within the games overall scope.

 

The developers of Final Fantasy XIII were divided into multiple teams, where each team would be assigned with a specific area of the game. XIII’s staff included many members who worked on previous entries in the series. The games Director, Motomu Toriyama worked on X and X-2, Kitase, as we know, worked on V through VIII, and Nomura was back as the main character designer. Since XIII was the first Final Fantasy game for the PlayStation 3, the crew wanted the game to have the same impact that VII and X had upon their release. Their sales goal was to hit 5 million copies sold, and Toriyami wanted the game to be the “ultimate single player RPG.”

 

Although I can’t say that XIII is the Ultimate………..single palyer RPG, It did meet, and exceed, their sales goal. As of now, Final Fantasy XIII has sold 6.71 million copies between the Ps3 and Xbox 360, making it the fourth biggest game in the series. It sold 1.7 Million copies in Japan, making it the fastest selling game in the franchise. The games budget would top out at Number 22 on the most expensive games to make list at 65+ million.

 

Final Fantasy XIII was released in December 2009 in Japan, and March of 2010 for the rest of the world. The game includes a very quick paced battle system, and an upgrading system similar to the Sphere Grid called Crystalarium. Players also customize paradigms, a sort of class assignment for your three person party, and the outcome of the battles heavily rely on the player “staggering” their opponents. This is essentially finding out what weakens them, and getting them into a critical state where more damage is dealt.

 

The character is controlled via a third person perspective. The character is also given a 360 degree camera movement. The entirety of the game is scaled relative to the characters, rather than a massive version of the character roaming a miniature terrain. Square brought back the Bestiary from Final Fatnasy XII, and also provided a way to level up ones weapons through components obtained, or bought at a save kiosk. Interestingly enough, the Final Fantasy XIII Ultimate Hits International version of the game, released in Japan, has an easy mode. This is interesting, because the company has talked about being concerned that their games are too difficult for us North Americans.

 

The battle system is similar to Final Fantasy XII in some ways. Most noticeably in that the character can approach or avoid enemies in the field. When the player touches an enemy, the screen transitions from the map to a battle screen similar to ones from previous entries in the series. XIII also only allows the use of three characters in battle, and uses a variant of Active Time Battle that we’ve all become accustomed to. The part where this game differs the most, is with the secondary characters. The player only controls the party leader, and the other two characters are controlled by AI. There is an extremely useful Autobattle function, where the game will automatically select actions to perform. The game also fully heals characters after a battle is complete. This makes the game sound super easy, right? No. You’re wrong. SO FUCKING WRONG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Every enemy has a chain counter. This counter starts at 100, and each enemy has different effects on creatures. Generally, black magic spells will make the chain counter jump very quickly, but the bar will quickly reset if not supplemented with a physical attack, or debuff. Once the meter is filled, the enemy will enter a Stagger state. This form is generally quite susceptible to physical damage, and the player can even launch most enemies into the air, rendering them attackless. These stagger states can be manipulated by assigning Paradigms to your party.

 

Paradigms are used to assign different roles to different characters. The six paradigms are Commando, Ravager, Medic, Saboteur, Sentinel, and Synergist. The Commando deals physical damage, Ravager is designated for black magic, Medics perform healing spells, Saboteurs attack enemies with various debuff spells, such as slow or deprotect, Sentinels raise a parties defence, and Synergists are used to assign buffs to your characters such as protect and haste. These classes can, and in many cases, must be quickly changed throughout battles to quickly defeat enemies. This gives Final Fantasy XIII a refreshingly fast battle system, and also leads to many game overs on non boss enemies.

 

Each character has a specific Eidolon that they can summon in battle. Only the party leader can select this skill, however, so the summoned creature depends on the leader. You can trigger a Gestalt mode for the Eidelons, and they will transform into a vehicle that the player then rides on during battle…..

 

REMIXES: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PUtJJLcQigw Born Anew Throwaway #2 Remix - TWE SHELLSHOCKR

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDOv_Ko3_IY Final Fantasy XIII Lightnings Theme Hip Hop Remix - L Rello Beats

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VWa5yr_xI6g "M" FFXIII Yaschas Massif FF 13 

ヤシャス山   lonlonjp

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwzw0cTBb34 Final Fantasy XIII "Ragnarok" Organ version - Jakah016

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EYtT1ilGlJs The Promise (Final Fantasy XIII) -Violen & Piano - Patti Rudisill

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-MPoWrMHN0 Final Fantasy XIII Eden Under Siege 8-Bit - 8BITTS

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jmyIcz7vLTw FFXIII Battle Theme Remix (Trance) - Beto Ceba

Direct download: ff13part2_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, Kaleb and Joe begin their review of Final Fantasy XIII. Enjoy!

As we know, Final Fantasy XIII is the start of the Fabula Nova Crystallis collection of Final Fantasy games, and was the first game Square used their internally developed Crystal Tools game engine with. This tool was created to further unify the game’s development, and bring the originally PlayStation 3 exclusive to the Xbox 360 and Wii consoles. This system was conceived by the success of the Final Fantasy VII Tech Demo, which also spurred Square Enix to release Final Fantasy XIII on the PlayStation 3, instead of the originally planned release on Playstation 2.

 

The game received received mostly positive reviews from video game publications, praising the graphics, presentation, and battle system. The story received mixed reviews, but the linearity would be the centerpiece of most criticisms for Final Fantasy XIII, especially when compared to the rest of the series.

 

Development for Final Fantasy XIII began in 2004, just after the Release of Final Fantasy X-2 International + Last Mission in Japan. Director Motomu Toriyama and Kazushige Nojima conceived ideas for the stories plotline over the first year. It was Nojima that thought up the crystal mythology that is the basis of the series, and the roles of the fal’Cie and l’Cie. Toriyama then created the story around the mythology. His goal was to show the characters at the mercy of a predetermined, unjust fate. He also wanted to create a group who belonged together, but clashed heavily. To go about this, they designed each of the sory’s thirteen chapters to focus on different members of the party. The structure of the narrative started to come together in 2006, when Daisuke Watanabe joined the team. Watanabe, as you may recall, filled in for Matsuno left the Final Fantasy XII development team due to sickness. Watanabe was given a rough outline of the first eight chapters, including necessary scenes that had to stay, and was told to strengthen Toriyama’s script. An example of what this entailed, is he would get a document that simply said “Snow and Hope reconcile”, and would decide how the scene would play out, and write his scenario accordingly. Watanabe also did some adjusting for characters. He felt that Lightning shouldn’t be a reliable and calm leader, and went with the more irritable, enraged Lightning we know. This was done to capture the confusion and unease that the characters no doubt would feel in light of their situations. Toriyama felt that the Sazh suicide scene was too dark, so elements such as the Chocobo chick helped maintain a good balance within the games overall scope.

 

The developers of Final Fantasy XIII were divided into multiple teams, where each team would be assigned with a specific area of the game. XIII’s staff included many members who worked on previous entries in the series. The games Director, Motomu Toriyama worked on X and X-2, Kitase, as we know, worked on V through VIII, and Nomura was back as the main character designer. Since XIII was the first Final Fantasy game for the PlayStation 3, the crew wanted the game to have the same impact that VII and X had upon their release. Their sales goal was to hit 5 million copies sold, and Toriyami wanted the game to be the “ultimate single player RPG.”

 

Although I can’t say that XIII is the Ultimate………..single palyer RPG, It did meet, and exceed, their sales goal. As of now, Final Fantasy XIII has sold 6.71 million copies between the Ps3 and Xbox 360, making it the fourth biggest game in the series. It sold 1.7 Million copies in Japan, making it the fastest selling game in the franchise. The games budget would top out at Number 22 on the most expensive games to make list at 65+ million.

 

Final Fantasy XIII was released in December 2009 in Japan, and March of 2010 for the rest of the world. The game includes a very quick paced battle system, and an upgrading system similar to the Sphere Grid called Crystalarium. Players also customize paradigms, a sort of class assignment for your three person party, and the outcome of the battles heavily rely on the player “staggering” their opponents. This is essentially finding out what weakens them, and getting them into a critical state where more damage is dealt.

 

The character is controlled via a third person perspective. The character is also given a 360 degree camera movement. The entirety of the game is scaled relative to the characters, rather than a massive version of the character roaming a miniature terrain. Square brought back the Bestiary from Final Fatnasy XII, and also provided a way to level up ones weapons through components obtained, or bought at a save kiosk. Interestingly enough, the Final Fantasy XIII Ultimate Hits International version of the game, released in Japan, has an easy mode. This is interesting, because the company has talked about being concerned that their games are too difficult for us North Americans.

 

The battle system is similar to Final Fantasy XII in some ways. Most noticeably in that the character can approach or avoid enemies in the field. When the player touches an enemy, the screen transitions from the map to a battle screen similar to ones from previous entries in the series. XIII also only allows the use of three characters in battle, and uses a variant of Active Time Battle that we’ve all become accustomed to. The part where this game differs the most, is with the secondary characters. The player only controls the party leader, and the other two characters are controlled by AI. There is an extremely useful Autobattle function, where the game will automatically select actions to perform. The game also fully heals characters after a battle is complete. This makes the game sound super easy, right? No. You’re wrong. SO FUCKING WRONG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Every enemy has a chain counter. This counter starts at 100, and each enemy has different effects on creatures. Generally, black magic spells will make the chain counter jump very quickly, but the bar will quickly reset if not supplemented with a physical attack, or debuff. Once the meter is filled, the enemy will enter a Stagger state. This form is generally quite susceptible to physical damage, and the player can even launch most enemies into the air, rendering them attackless. These stagger states can be manipulated by assigning Paradigms to your party.

 

Paradigms are used to assign different roles to different characters. The six paradigms are Commando, Ravager, Medic, Saboteur, Sentinel, and Synergist. The Commando deals physical damage, Ravager is designated for black magic, Medics perform healing spells, Saboteurs attack enemies with various debuff spells, such as slow or deprotect, Sentinels raise a parties defence, and Synergists are used to assign buffs to your characters such as protect and haste. These classes can, and in many cases, must be quickly changed throughout battles to quickly defeat enemies. This gives Final Fantasy XIII a refreshingly fast battle system, and also leads to many game overs on non boss enemies.

 

Each character has a specific Eidolon that they can summon in battle. Only the party leader can select this skill, however, so the summoned creature depends on the leader. You can trigger a Gestalt mode for the Eidelons, and they will transform into a vehicle that the player then rides on during battle…..

 

REMIXES: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PUtJJLcQigw Born Anew Throwaway #2 Remix - TWE SHELLSHOCKR

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDOv_Ko3_IY Final Fantasy XIII Lightnings Theme Hip Hop Remix - L Rello Beats

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VWa5yr_xI6g "M" FFXIII Yaschas Massif FF 13 

ヤシャス山   lonlonjp

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwzw0cTBb34 Final Fantasy XIII "Ragnarok" Organ version - Jakah016

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EYtT1ilGlJs The Promise (Final Fantasy XIII) -Violen & Piano - Patti Rudisill

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-MPoWrMHN0 Final Fantasy XIII Eden Under Siege 8-Bit - 8BITTS

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jmyIcz7vLTw FFXIII Battle Theme Remix (Trance) - Beto Ceba

 

Direct download: FF13part1_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

Join us as we go further into the history of Limit Break Radio. This time, we cover the reason behind the lacking of closure to the Final Fantasy XI days, and what went into reviving the show for Final Fantasy XIV. Aniero also gives us a breakdown of the reunion of the crew for A Radio Reborn. This launched just before our Podcast was conceived. Enjoy the episode, and thanks again to Aniero for coming on as a guest.

 

REMIX: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kCxX60g-5Kk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GeyUETPAjU

 

Direct download: aneiropart2_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, we're honored to have Aniero Grigori, frontman for Limit Break Radio on the show. We talk about the original Final Fantasy XI program that was launched in 2006. Aniero goes into depth on what got him into the series, the Legend of Dragoon, and discusses the formation of the powerhouse that is Limit Break Radio. He also goes a little behind the scenes with his personal hurdles throughout the show, and discusses various line up changes. Enjoy the episode, and thanks again for guest hosting!

Direct download: aniropart1_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

Nasir Gebelli

      By Kaleb Schweiss

Nasir Gebelli was a programmer for Square Enix. He was part of Square’s A-Team, along with Nobou Uematsu and Yoshitaka Amano to create Final Fantasy. But that’s not the first project Nasir took on at Square, nor was it his first programming job.

 

Nasir was born in Iran, and later moved to the US to study computer science. In 1980, he started a company called Sirius Software with a guy named Jerry Jewell. Gebelli made numerous strides within Sirius, including creating advanced graphics techniques for the Apple II. His first project was a program called EasyDraw; a logo and character creation program that he would use for his later games. It was with Sirius that Gibelli developed a reputation for quickly producing games. He would program as many as twelve games a year. One in particular, Gorgo, ended up selling around 23,000 copies; making it one of the best selling computer games in the early 80’s.

 

In 1981, Gebelli left Sirius to establish his own software company named Gebelli Software. He released  a few successful games, but by 1983, his games were becoming notoriously bad according to Softalk, a magazine focusing on computers and games. The Video Game Crash of 1983 would lead Gebelli’s company in shambles, and he closed his doors.

 

After Gebelli Software went belly up, Nasir did what any sensible businessman would do. He traveled the world for a few years. He would eventually resurface in 1986 when he went to visit a friend, Doug Carlston who owns Broderbund. This was the company who originally did the Carmen Sandiego games. Calrlston told Gebelli about the rising power of the NES, and suggested that Nasir should program for it. Gebelli was interested, and travelled with Doug to Japan; where he would meet with Nintendo and Square. Nintendo would ultimately be uninterested in Gebelli, but Square, and especially The Gutch, were aware of his reputation and excited to have him join the team. His joining of Square eventually let to the separation of Square from the parent company Denyuusha.

 

Gebelli’s first game with Square would be 3-D WorldRunner for the NES. THis was a forward scrolling third person action game. It was one of the first stereoscopic 3D games, which gives the game a more 3D feel. Gibelli would then program Rad Racer, and it’s sequel later in 1990.

 

And now, now that he has a few games under his belt, Gebelli, Sakaguchi, Uematsu, and Amano began to produce Final Fantasy, which would later be released in 1987. Final Fantasy featured numerous unique features such as the character creation system, classes, and the ever famous battle system. Gebelli and team didn’t miss a beat, and went on to create Final Fantasy II. This game introduced emotional story lines, and much more tragic events. The game also replaced traditional leveling with the activity based progression system, which would later go on to influence the SaGa and Grandia series, FF IV, and The Elder Scrolls series. Final Fantasy II also introduced an innovative dialogue system where key words would be memorized and used during conversations with NPC’s.

Next comes Final Fantasy III, which came out in 1990. This game introduced the ever beloved job class system. Midway through the development of both Final Fantasy II and Final Fantasy III, Gebelli was forced to return to Sacramento, California due to an expired work visa. The rest of the staff followed him to Sacramento to finish producing the games.

 

Gibelli would take another long break before returning to work on Secret of Mana, which is the second in the Mana series, released in 1993. Secret of Mana was more of an action role playing game, and included a cooperative multiplayer mode. The game was initially going to be one of the launching titles on the SNES CD, but was later altered to a cartridge due to the SNES CD being dropped. This game received critical acclaim, mainly for its real time battle system, innovative co op gameplay, in which second and third players could join in and drop out of the game at any time, and the customizable AI settings for computer controlled allies…. GAMBITS!!!!


After Secret of Mana, Gibelli basically retired from royalties from Square and, you guessed it, traveled the world. He would later attend John Romero’s, co founder of ID Software, Apple II reunion in Dallas. Romero credited Gebelli as a major influence on his career. Gebelli lives in Sacramento, and remains good friends with Hironobu Sakaguchi.

 

REMIX: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uarsKpKN68A

Direct download: UFFpodcast70_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, Joe prepares another excellent information segment on the History of Square Enix. This time, we learn about how Enix was stomping Square in Japan. This is in regards to the sales numbers between the first four Final Fantasy and Dragon Quest games. We discover how long it took Square to come out with a game that nearly matched Enix's sales in Japan, and discuss the difference in sales for North America. We also decide to play Final Fantasy XIV on. We decided on Brinhildr server for now, due to bribes from Dr. Rockso. Enjoy the episode!

 

REMIX: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cQ8QiTd2Baw By HighwindIV

Direct download: UFF69_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, we return to the stovetop for a cooking episode. This time, we cook the Tsenoble Pork tenderloin. This recipe was submitted by Gabranth on the forums, and is found on ffrecipes.wordpress.com. We also decided to bring a little alcohol into the mix. This was brought in the form of the Chocobo Cocktail. This drink consisted of some pineapple rum, lime juice, and a slice of lemon. We finally get to read some iTunes reviews, and give the questions segment some well deserved love. Enjoy the episode!

Direct download: uff_episode68_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week,  Kaleb and Joe discuss their newly formed theories behind the release date for Final Fantasy XV. We also answer a few questions, and gave a timeframe for beginning Final Fantasy XIV. Enjoy the grind!

Direct download: ff15predictions2_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, we have a short episode discussing the Final Fantasy VII remake. We found a petition on change.org asking Mr. T to voice Barrett in the upcoming Final Fantasy VII remake. We also discuss the IOS release of Final Fantasy VII. Enjoy the grind guys!

Direct download: UFF_Ep66_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, in light of the more recent Final Fantasy battle systems, Kaleb and Joe discuss the evolution of automation within the Final Fantasy series. We discuss how we feel it's largely based upon the increased size of the games, as well as the increased complexity of each battle. We also answer some more user submitted questions, and show off a few new jingels we've mixed for you guys.

Enjoy the episode!

Direct download: UFF_episode_65_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This time, we finish the fight. We go over the Gameplay, design, music, legacy and ranking. We also took the time to read some listener reviews of the game, courtesy of our wonderful forum members. We talk about a bunch of the extra content the game has to offer, including the hunts. We also go over a few of the extra bosses. Enjoy the grind!

 

Remixes

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pCzY801ZHE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHSpGvd-Jy8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LsrgyCn8adU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VWAJZ7rU2PY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cv73PYw71rk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aX-wPtcq700

Direct download: UFF_64_FF12p2_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

Final Fantasy XII began development in the year 2000, after Final Fantasy Xi’s announcement, and would become the game with the longest development time in history when it was finally released in 2006. The development was a tumultuous one as well as an expensive one, costing 35 Million USD to create, an estimated 12 million more than FF10.

 

The game was to be co-directed with Hiroyuki Ito (of FF6 and FF9 fame) and a man named Yasumi Matsuno, who had previously helmed and penned the very popular game Vagrant Story as well as Final Fantasy Tactics. It was Matsuno who had come up with the story of FF12, and Ito, along with battle designer Hiroshi Tomomatsu, was well underway with the creation of his new FF battle system called the “Active Dimension system”, drawing inspiration from the plays in American football.

 

It was to be a truly glorious combination of Square’s creative teams.

 

And Square-Enix spared no expense. The art team was shipped off to Turkey to draw up design ideas for the game, and much of the early development of FF12 was based upon custom-creating the tools used to make the game, drawing upon the same game engine as FF11 to create a type of MMO experience in a single player game.

 

A couple things about the early iterations of Final Fantasy 12:

  • There was a planned 2-player mode.

  • There were plans to allow for recruitments of non-player characters to join in mob hunts.

  • There was a job system.

  • Basch was initially meant to be the main character of the story.

 

But, as I said before, FF12’s development was a troubled one.

 

Halfway through production, Hironobu Sakaguchi, series creator, quit Square-Enix altogether, taking a huge chunk of the Final Fantasy XII development team with him to his new company, Mistwalker. Devastated by this blow to the project, co-director Yasumi Matsuno refused to come to work for a month after the split.

 

Rumors are that Matsuno was extremely temperamental after that. And in 2005 Matsuno stepped down from his position, claiming illness as the cause. He has since stated that though he had in-fact been sick, he felt he had disappointed the staff, shareholders, and fans who were looking forward to the game. Matsuno would later follow Sakaguchi to Mistwalker to work on the game Terra Battle.

 

Series veteran Nobuo Uematsu would also bow out of this Final Fantasy, leaving Square in 2004, Uematsu’s only tracks appearing on FF12 would be Final Fantasy’s main theme and the ending song, fitting called “Kiss me Goodbye”.

 

Hitoshi Sakimoto was the primary replacement for Uematsu, with a handful of tracks created by Square-Enix composers, Hayato Matsuo and Masaharu Iwata.

 

To finish up the game, Matsuno was hurriedly replaced by Hiroshi Minagawa to salvage the game. Later, that same person would be one of the staff members sent to save another troubled FF game, FF14.

 

Within this environment of ever-changing staff members, there were some ever-changing aspects of the game tacked on:

  • The planned 2-player mode and NPC recruitment were dropped from FF12 due to hardware limitations, and the fact that trying to implement those systems would cause too many delays.

  • The Job system was dropped as Square-Enix decided that such a complex system would “confuse the players” as well as make the game’s development even longer. This would later be put back in, in a way, with the release of a game called “Final Fantasy XII International Zodiac Job System” in 2007.

  • And lastly, Basch was deemed as too old and too tough of a character for the target demographic of the game, and in order to make up for this, the characters Vaan and Penelo were created. Vaan starting out as a tough guy and ending up an outgoing, spunky kid.

 

In 2005 a playable demo of FF12 was released with the game Dragon Quest 8, and in March of 2006 the full game followed in Japan. In october of 2006, North America received the game, and in February of 2007 it was released in Europe and Australia.

 

Despite all the setbacks, FF12 was a large commercial success, selling over 5 million copies and becoming the 4th biggest Ps2 game of 2006. It was also a mega-hit critically, winning multiple game of the year awards, and recieving top scores by many critics.

 

Yet, a few years later and FF12 is nearly forgotten. Often seen as a low-point in the series, many fans of the Final Fantasy series see 12 as a disappointment. In one of the reviews for the game, Gamespot criticized it for having the weakest soundtrack in the series, and many a youtube reviewer have expressed disinterest in the weak characters of Vaan and Penelo, saying that they had nothing to contribute to the story. Series creator Hironobu Sakaguchi said he couldn’t play more than the first 20 minutes, and executive producer Akitoshi Kawazu stated that although he was happy with the perfect famitsu score of 40/40 for the game, he felt that it was far from perfect, and that the storyline did not meet expectations.

 

The legacy of FF12 is a conflicting one indeed…

 

Remixes

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pCzY801ZHE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHSpGvd-Jy8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LsrgyCn8adU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VWAJZ7rU2PY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cv73PYw71rk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aX-wPtcq700

Direct download: UFF_63_FF12p1_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, Kaleb prepares another Mythic Origins episode. Enjoy!

Mythic and Literature Origins of Rare Game from Final Fantasy XII

 

Aspidochelon- Likely derived from Aspidochelone, which according to medieval bestiaries is a huge sea creature that resembles a whale or turtle.

 

Dismas- May refer to Saint Dismas, who according to Christian belief was one of the two thieves crucified alongside Jesus. The other thief, Gestas, mocked Jesus for not saving them, Dismas was accepting of his punishment, and asked to be remembered in Heaven. In many traditions, Dismas is on Jesus’ left, which is why some depictions of the crucifixion depict his head tilted to the right, toward Dismas.

 

Arioch- Hebrew name that means fierce lion. It originally appears in the BOok of Genesis, being the name of the “King of Ellasar.”

 

Aeros- This one is pretty straightforward. Aero is a Greek prefix relating to air and flight.

 

Kris- The kris is a dagger from the Malayan archipelago. It is often made with a wavy blade, and is used for both spiritual means and as a weapon.

 

Ishteen- Means one in Ancient Assyro-Babylonian language. This is symbolic, due to this rare game only appearing once, as he is a Trophy Rare Game.

 

Chocobo- Chocobo derives from a Japanese Brand of Chocolate malt ball, Called ChocoBall. The mascot for the product is Kyoro-chan, a bird who says kweh…. WTF!!7

 

Anubys- Obviously derived from Anubis, the greek name for the Jackal-headed god associated with mummification and the afterlife in Egyptian Mythology.

 

Phyllo- Phyllo is greek for leaf. It is also the name of a greek pastry, which is made up of tissue thin layers.

 

Matriarch Bomb- Another obvious one. Matriarch denotes a social organization style in which the mother, or eldest female, heads the family and descent and relationship are determined through the female line. They are generally the most powerful in political positions also.

 

duism.

Vishno- Possibly derived from Vishnu, a popular Hindu god. He is venerated as the Supreme Being in the Vaishnava sect of Hin

Imdugud- Imdugud is a lesser divinity of Akkadian mythology. He is the son of the bird goddess Siris. In Mesopotamian Legend, it is known as a lion-headed bird and the sone of the sky god Anu. Also known as Anzu.



Tarasque- Derives from Christian Legend. Tarasque was a giant sea serpent with a turtle shell, lions head, and scorpion tail. This beast terrorized France. Saint Martha supposedly charmed the Tarasque into town, where the townspeople slaughtered it. The beast supposedly offered no resistance.

 

Grimalkin- An old or evil looking female cat. Scottish legend refers to the grimalkin as a faery cat that dwells in the highlands. May be derived from the 1570 book Beware the Cat, by William Baldwin.

 

Nekhbet- Nekhbet was an early, predynastic local goddess. She was the patron of the city Nekheb. She was often depicted as a vulture, a creature that Egyptians thought only existed as females, having to adopt children. The preistesses of Nekhbet were called muu, meaning “mothers”, and wore robes of white vulture feathers.

 

Cultsworn Lich- Easy one. A lich is an undead creature. Often, this creature is a result of a transformation, such as a powerful person striving for eternal life. This is obtained by spells or rituals, allowing the individual to bind his intellect to his animated corpse, and achieve immortality.

 

Juggernaut- Unstoppable force. Derived from the Sanskrit, Jagannatha, meaning lord of the universe.

 

Kaiser- German title meaning Emperor. Derives from the name of Julius Caesar. Many languages use a descendant of the word Caesar to mean Emperor, such as the Russian Tsar.

 

Tower- This enemy is a derivation of Babil. It is eluded that this is meant to be the Tower of Babel. This is from a story in the book of Genesis. The story tells of how early humanity was living in one city, and begun to construct a great tower that would extend to the heavens so they could see God. God was pissed, and destroyed the tower, and confused their language. Thus forcing people to spread out among the Earth.

 

Luxollid- Derived from the Latin word lux, which means lite. It may use the Latin olim, meaning at another time. This may refer to the Gods of XII creating the creature a long time ago.

 

Rain Dancer- Obvious….

 

Apsara- A female spirit of the clouds and waters in Hindu or Buddhist mythology. Usually translated to nymphs.

 

And my favorite,

 

Midgardsormr- This name comes from Norse mythology, in which Midgardsormr, or “Jormungardr” was the middle child of Loki and a giantess named Angrobada. Odin threw it into the ocean that encircles Midgar (earth) and it grew large enough to reach around the world. It was foreseen that Midgardsormr would do battle with his arch nemesis Thor, on the day of Ragnarok. The sky would darken from the poison mist from Midgardsormr, and the battle would end with the death of them both. Thor will kill Midgardsormr, and then stagger nine steps before dying from its poison.

 

***Remix***

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNY1dnIcxJk

Direct download: UFF_62_RareGame_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

History of Square-Enix: Part 2 - From Power Lines to Programming

 

As Enix was formed from another company, so was square. The Square we know today was created out of an affiliate of a power company originally owned by the father of a young man named Masafumi Miyamoto. After Miyamoto graduated from Waseda University, he began developing computer games through his father’s company, then called Dan-Yu-Sha in 1983.

 

Miyamoto, much like his Enix counterpart, Yasuhiro Fukushima, was much more of a businessman than a programmer. But Miyamoto saw the rising electronic market in japan, and he wanted to make money out of it. Despite his purely financial motivations, Miyamoto figured he knew what it would take to make a good computer game.

 

Through his father’s company, he began hiring college graduates and creative types to help work on his games. During this time, it was pretty typical for a game to be made from scratch by one single programmer, but Miyamoto, hoping to save development time, hired many different people for different creative posts during game development.

 

He was especially concerned with making games that were more visually impressive than the other games on the market, so he had applicants do pixel art at part of their recruiting process. He was also sure to bring in programmers who could figure out how to make the games with such complex graphics, into something that the machines could handle.

 

Under Dan-Yu-Sha, the first games Miyamoto produced were called Death Trap, and its sequel, “Will”. “Will” was a big success, and sold 100 thousand copies. Following “Will”, Square ported another game called “Thexder” to the Nintendo Famicom, which came out before a string of unsuccessful Famicom games.

 

In 1986, as we said before, the Square we know and love was officially founded, and relocated from Yokohama to Tokyo to begin producing a Role-Playing game thought up by the Director of Planning at the company, Hironobu Sakaguchi. Highly influenced by Dragon Warrior, this Role-Playing game would be called DUN DUN DUN!!!! Final Fantasy.

 

There are a couple differing stories surrounding the title of Final Fantasy. The traditional story is that of a company in financial peril and one last ditch effort of a project to save them from utter failure.

 

The other story, (more likely the truth) as told by Sakaguchi, was that he had originally titled the game “Fighting Fantasy”, but that the titled had already been trademarked. In order to keep the pleasing sounding “FF” as the game’s shorthand, they came up with “Final Fantasy”.

 

For more history behind that game, refer back to Episode 1 of this podcast.

 

Anyway, the game was released and was a great commercial success, selling half a million copies and spawning the Final Fantasy series in 1987. Funnily enough, the first Final Fantasy game didn’t sell nearly as well as the first Dragon Quest.

 

And we’ll see in the later that there is a certain pattern to Square’s sales and Enix’s sales. You see, Square would sell well in Japan, but even better outside of Japan. Enix would bust the block in terms of Japanese sales, but never would break into the western market all that well.


Almost like marketing rivals, the first year a Final Fantasy was released, Enix’s project Dragon Quest 2, raised the bar with 2.4 million copies sold.

Direct download: UFF_EP61_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

Kaleb and Joe talk over Episode VII of Final Fantasy Unlimited. Enjoy!

Direct download: Commentary_FFU7_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, we interview Daniel Burke of the Beacause Project. The Beacause Project is a long running re translation effort of Final Fantasy VII. Daniel discusses the biggest motivators behind the translation effort. He talks about all the lost moments in Final Fantasy VII. Daniel did more than discuss the simple grammatical and spelling errors of Final Fantasy VII.

Hi, guys!  Just had the interview and it was a lot of fun.  I'll respond to questions here that we didn't manage to talk about and I hope you enjoy the interview as much as I did :)


 

What were your first thoughts when playing FF7 the first time?
 

I had just had a Playstation bought for Christmas 1997 and had come from playing the Sega Megadrive games.  I was not prepared for the cinematic FMV opening of FF7 in the slightest.  It was way ahead of anything else I had ever seen.  The music, the sound, the graphics, the direction - everything.  I was awestruck.  Then the game started and it just kept getting better.  I'm actually getting warm feelings right now thinking about it, and this despite the hours I've already ploughed into the game.  The thing that irritated me (the only thing) were the random battles.  I wasn't used to that and it bugged me at first - so much so that I couldn't beat Gi Nattak in Cosmo Canyon because I had already escaped around 300 times by that point. I learned to get over my irritation of the random battles from that point on, though.  Funnily enough, years later I learned I could have just used that Elixir you can pick up beforehand, rather than go outside and level up.  Shame.  Although I'd only have gotten stuck again at Materia Keeper.

At some point, I realized that this was the greatest game I had ever played.  Imho, the game that has come closest in overall excellence since is Final Fantasy X (FF8-9 are great, as is Resident Evil II, MGS1, Sonic and Knuckles, Mario 3, Mario 64, Ocarina of Time...I better stop there, there are so many).    

 

What did you think of the final dungeon and final boss(es) of FF7?
 


Too easy and rather bizarrely (pun) shoehorned into the game.  But FFs have a habit of doing that with final bosses... Necron, anyone?  The music for the three bosses is great, and Sepher Sephiroth is awesome.  Even his intro is brilliant.  As for the final dungeon, it was brilliantly made and executed.  All the way down that chasm I had hairs standing on end.

 


What did you think of One Winged Angel the first time you heard it?
 


I wasn't ready for the choir, that was a surprise.  It's one of the greatest in game music history.  I personally put it second only to FF7's main theme. It's the genius of Uematsu. In the early days, I was also rather fanboyish, so I tried to add my own voice to it with my cousins', lmao.  I opened the disc holder on intro because I realized that the voice files might be being loaded at a later time.  I was right. But it doesn't help because instead of the orchestra voices, you get a weird droning tone instead.

 

-Has he ever seen the Spanish translation of this game?
 


If you mean the original one, no... but I don't know Spanish, so it wouldn't help.  Someone is using our translation to create a new Spanish translation, too. So that's cool!  I do recall that the Spanish version, and numerous others, used the English localization instead of the Japanese.  So it was a double whammy.  The French version is also terrible.  

 

- Phoenix Down vs Phoenix Tail, while i love most of the translations and while i am sure this one is based on sound reasoning, i can't help feel it is uneccesary. This is unlike Aerith to Aries which they later corrected in other games, Phoenix Down has always been translated as such even up to the newest releases. I would have just put this in the same group as the Moogles, something that while it may not be an exact translation but that has been more or less cemented as what that is.
 


It's a fair point, but there is a logical reason for the decision I made.  From the start, the plan was to localize it based entirely on the Japanese, using the original English localization, and other documentation, to do the best job we could.  I, and the translator, agreed that putting limits on what was  - and was not - acceptable would end up having a detrimental effect on the project.  At the end of the project, I added options to restore certain names because they had a rich history with the series.  These were a minority, but I think definitely a good idea.  You can change Last Elixir to Megalixir, Moguri to Moogle, and Phoenix Tail to Phoenix Down with the installer options. So no loss at all.  As for Aeris, even if someone didn't like Aerith, they could just rename her at the naming screen.

 

What was your most difficult text map to work on in ff7?
 

There are a few:

For language: Pagoda.  You'll see why in the interview.

For flow: The very first main scene with all the exposition ("No, Jessie he's not with Shin-Ra anymore", and so on).  
            The Aerith death scene was also very difficult to make flow right.  I'm still not 100% happy with it, but I think this is an original writing issue and not             my fault.

Script error: If you lose at Fort Condor during Huge Materia mission, you see a cutscene where all the villagers have died, and it was not localized properly at all.  I assume that because dying there was almost impossible, no tester saw the scene.  It needed reprogramming.

Ifalna scene at Icicle Lodge:  Flow here again, too, because the text was not in order in the map (this happened from time to time) and making all that exposition flow correctly and sound good was challenging.  It had probably 5-8 revisions.  It sounds great now, I'm happy to say!

 

Which character in ff7 was the easiest to work on?
 


Yuffie.  All the characters were originally localized quite well as far as 'feel' is concerned. Barrett was a bit over the top, though.  Yuffie was easiest because I have a friend who is just like her.  It was a breeze and really fun to localize that character.  One scene where the dialogue is completely nonsensical is the following:


{YUFFIE}
“Are you waiting for {CLOUD}?”{NEW}
“He's flying right now, so you can't get him.”{NEW}
“Were you going to force me
into the submarine right now?”{NEW}
“Quit it!
If you want to go, then just leave me behind.”{NEW}
“…ooooooh.
What're you talking about? I…”

New:

{YUFFIE}
“{CLOUD}…
Have you decided
where we're going yet?”{NEW}
“Come on,I can't take
much more of this.”{NEW}
“Hey,you're not thinking of
shovin' me in that crappy
sub,are you!?”{NEW}
“I won't go! Never!
Leave me here,
leave me here!”{NEW}
“…Urrrk.
What am I saying?”

*note, I've made the game add spaces after commas.

 

Since you have accomplished your goal of ff7 was there a game in the past not including ff7 where the dialogue aggrivated you to almost the point of translating it?
 


No :P


 

Man I guess the remake of FF7 puts a bit of a downer on this guy work
 

Not at all. Although I'd be far happier if I was the director of the remake and could use our localization.  Or, at the least, use our localization.  But the remake is going to be very different and I think our work will still be relevant after it is released.  Once the hype dies down, I believe mass apathy will set in (you'll see why I think that from interview), and more people will want to play the original at that point - not less.  I've also learned how to program in assembly, localize, and lots of other skills from this project that made it worthwhile - even if everyone hated it or never played it.

Thanks everyone.  Let me know how you find the interview.



Edit:

Oh, one other thing.  I didn't mention that other people contributed to the project.  Prince Lex helped with Scottish (being a Scot) and Covarr did a thorough grammar check.  He also helps me from time to time outside of the project :)  The pagoda scene absolutely needed Covarr's input to make sure we hadn't made mistakes with the older English.  So yeah, check the credits list too.  :) 

I also suggest waiting for R04, if you are planning on going through the game.  That will be the last main update to translation / menu.

Direct download: uff_60_danielburke_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, Joe has prepared a special history episode. We delve into the origins of Enix. Strangely enough, they began as a real estate tabloid company, formed by Yasuhiro Fukushima. Fukushima is now one of the wealthiest Japanese men. Enix started their foray into video games when Fukushima spent some time in America. He noticed how popular computer games were, and decided to have a contest for building games.  Koichi Nakamura, one of the contest winners, would later be a key player behind the scenes of the Dragon Quest series. Enix also began as a publisher, rather than the commmon style of in house game design. Enix's third video game would put them on the map forever. Dragon Quest. Enjoy!

Direct download: uff_59_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, our interview with the creator of the Beacause Project fell through, so we are revisiting a fan favorite. This time, we discuss Anima from Final Fantasy X. Anima is the inner self of an individual. Psychologist C.G. Jung, said it's the female side of the male psyche. The Latin meaning of Anima is soul, spirit, ghost; breath of life. We also delve into Bismark, a summon from Final Fantasy VI. Bismark is likely named after the Chancellor of Prussia in the late 1800's. This theory is largely based off of the espers Sea Song ability, which would refer to the Bismarck ship that was sunk in 1941. We move on to discuss the final summon, Crusader, or Jihad. Crusader is another Esper featured in Final Fantasy VI. His name was originally Jihad in Japan, but they censored the name for the North American release of the game, fearing that North American players would associate the name with an Islamic Jihad. Jihad doesn't inherently imply evil. It's usually a term used for the battle between good and evil. It can also be used to describe a holy war, which is most likely the purpose that Crusader serves in Final Fantasy VI. We also move on to talk about a few questions asked by forum users, and declare that the Final Fantasy XIV gift card is the prize. Thanks again for listening, and enjoy the grind!

Direct download: uff_episode58_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, Kaleb and Joe discuss the long awaited Final Fantasy VII Remake announced at this years E3 conference. We discuss our concerns about the upcoming remake, and delve in to the hilt on what we feel will happen with the games direction. We talk about the involvement of the original development team, including Yoshinori Kitase, Nojima, and of couse, Tetsuya Nomura. We rain on everyones parade a bit in terms of the remake, but also hold out hope that this will be a solid entry in the series. We do a few reaction videos to the FFVII Remake trailer, as well as the announcement of World of Final Fantasy. We discuss the few articles of news involving Kingdom Hearts 3. We also announced a Twitch based contest, where I will ask a trivia question, and the winner will either win a copy of FF VII on PSN or Steam, or a one month gift card for Final Fantasy XIV. This will be up for vote on our site. Enjoy the episode!

Direct download: UFF_episode57_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, we discuss the update to everyone's favorite demo, Final Fantasy XV Episode Duscae. We discuss the mini quests that Square Enix has given us, involving fetching items, and doing other activities with Noctis's team mates. We also touch on the new combo system, and discuss the changes to the camera and the added AI intelligence for your party members. They're not nearly as in the way as before!! We also give a little time to update you guys on our progress in Final Fantasy XII. After that, we dive into our usual question segments, and encourage you guys to call in for the questions segment! After that, we discuss the popular Robot Chicken Parody of Final Fantasy VII, in which the team works at a burger joint run by Sephiroth. We then hit on the Question from us to You, which involves a poll between Final Fantasy XII, and Final Fantasy XIII. Enjoy the episode! SORRY FOR THE AUDIO ISSUES THIS WEEK! TURNS OUT WE HAD A BAD CORD AND WE DIDN'T KNOW UNTIL WE WERE MIXING!

Direct download: uffepisode56_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

Join us once again for our fourth part of our review of Final Fantasy XI. Krinital, Art, and Banedrom help us remember the details of certain story elements, and we get to discussing the amazing multiplayer element that Final Fantasy XI has. We talk about the games musical score, the last one legendary Nobou Uematsu would compose. We also discuss our rankings of the Final Fantasy games up to this point, and give our reasoning behind it. Special thanks to Art, Banedrom, Krinital, Megadave, Jen, and of course Darth Jommu. You guys helped to make this a great experience, and we look forward to recreating it with Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn. Enjoy!

Direct download: ffxipart4_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, we invite Krinital, Banedrom, and Art on for a special recap of Final Fantasy XI. We talk in great detail about the multiplayer aspects of Final Fantasy XI. We discuss the rank 5 and on missions in the Bastok nation quests, and go over all of the level cap quests. We discuss a little on the changes that Rhapsodies of Vana'Diel have brough, and talk about the importance of the fourth trust. Thanks for playing along guys, and enjoy the grind!

Direct download: ffxipart3_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, we discuss Final Fantasy XV turning 9 years old! We talk about what we think will happen for the release of Final Fantasy XV. We talk about how after Final Fantasy XIII's demo, Square Enix created a majority of the game's content within the last 9 months of creation. We also discuss how Square Enix is breaking new ground once again, by creating an update to their Final Fantasy XV: Episode Duscae demo. We also discuss our battle plan upon Final Fantasy XV's release. We won't be dropping whatever game we're on, but the release won't exactly sneak up on us. We also take time to answer some well thought out questions from our forum members. Thank for listening guys. Enjoy!

Direct download: ultimafinalfantasyxvis9yearsold_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, we discuss the finer aspects of Final Fantasy XI. We discuss the gameplay of Final Fantasy XI, ranging from the controls, macros, magic system, and the semi newly added Trust magic. We then move on to discuss the design of Final Fantasy XI. We discuss the variety of enemies, as well as the area designs. We talk about the lack of CGI cutscenes and voice acting in this entry, which strikes us as odd, especially after Final Fantasy X. We move on from there to discuss Final Fantasy XI's musical score. Nobou Uematsu's final Final Fantasy. He scored the major themes in the original version of Final Fantasy XI. The expansions for the game were scored solely by Naoshi Mizuta. We then go on to discuss the dwindling legacy that Final Fantasy XI has, and also the impact it had on the future of both the Final Fantasy series, and also MMORPG's in general. Enjoy!

Direct download: UFF52_mixdownFINAL.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

Join us as we discuss this mammoth of a game! Final Fantasy XI is done! Well, at least the original Bastok missions are. Join us as we review the interesting development of Final Fantasy XI. We discuss how Final Fantasy XI was many firsts for Square Enix, and was the first cross platform MMORPG ever. We run through the story, where the adventurer begins a quest to slay the notorious Shadow Lord by becoming an errand boy and then a diplomat for your nation! Enjoy part one of this epic review!

Direct download: UFF51_mixdownFINAL.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, we have a special episode for our 50th episode! Join us as we discuss the future of our show, our progress in Final Fantasy XI, and the removal and additions of segments for our podcast. We also take the time to catch up on some questions that were being backed up, and announce that next week we will be doing a review episode for Final Fantasy XI! We discuss a little more about our presence on Twitch tv moving forward, and thank all of you listeners and donors on Patreon for your support as we work our way through the epic series that is Final Fantasy! Enjoy!

Direct download: UFF50_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, we cover the career of Kazushige Nojima. We discuss his involvement with the Final Fantasy series, and discuss his most important involvments in the series. We also discuss his influence on some of the most popular Final Fantasy games in tlhe series. We take this week to do some catch up on news, and discuss the addition of Final Fantasy XIII to mobile phones, and discuss the arcade Dissidia game, along with the possibility of it becoming available on PlayStation 4 in the future. We also discuss the furure of our playthrough of Final Fantasy XI Enjoy!

Direct download: kazushigenojima.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This episode picks up right where the last one left off. We discuss the gameplay aspects of Final Fantasy X, including the battle system, sphere grid, side quests and more. We move on to discuss the numerous mini games that Final Fantasy X features, including the infamous chocobo catcher and lighning dodging minigames. We also discuss the games artwork and character design, as well as it's top of the notch soundtrack from Nobou Uematsu. We also discuss the addition of the dark aeons to the HD remastered version that we played, and of course add it to our final ranking! Enjoy this second half of our beefy Final Fantasy X review.

Direct download: ff10part2_mixdown128at16.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This week, we have reached the long awaited Final Fantasy X review. In this first half of the episode, we discuss the development history of the game. We discuss how the game was announced at the same time as Final Fantasy IX and Final Fantasy X. This was the first entry in the series to feature voice acting and fully rendered images. We also discuss the games story, and go through it step by step with commentary and explanation along the way! Enjoy our review of the must play Final Fantasy X!

Direct download: ff10_mixdown128.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

In preparation for the Final Fantasy X review, this week we decided to catch up on all of our segments up to this point! We discuss numerous topics from the question segment pertaining to the Final Fantasy series. We also discuss that we will be playing Final Fantasy XI on the Siren server. We discuss what the ultimate Final Fantasy restaraunt will contain, and also discuss the immense importance of Yojimbo using Zanmato in Final Fantasy X. We also discuss where we are in the soon to be reviewed Final Fantasy X! Enjoy the grind!!

Direct download: UFF_46_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

Join us as we pit these two Final Fantasy protagonists against each other in this showdown of epic proportions! We each take a side in the battle, and discuss what elements lead the better man to victory! We also discuss some end of game sphere level grinding in Final Fantasy X. We also discuss the eligibility of the online Final Fantasy games, and discuss whether or not they belong in the main series of Final Fantasy games. Enjoy!

Direct download: episode44.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

Join us as we discuss the release of Final Fantasy Type-0, as well as the well awaited, incredibly fun and addicting Final Fantasy XV: Episode Duscae Demo. We discuss how we felt about the changed game mechanics and battle system. We discuss the epic scope of the game, and how we feel the size will add to the experience. We also anser some great Final Fantasy related questions in the question segment, and give our overall reaction to how excited we are for Final Fantasy XV. The answer is very!

Direct download: UFF_44_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

Welcome back! This week, we discuss difficulty in the Final Fantasy series up to Final Fantasy X. We discuss what makes a game difficult as well as what makes it good. We also weigh in on what we feel Square Enix has done well for Final Fantasy, and also discuss what has been lost over time. We also discuss what we feel will bring new era players to the Final Fantasy series, and discuss the "End" of Final Fantasy in our question segment. We also give a little insight as to what we are aiming to achieve in this current play through of Final Fantas X, and give a status update as to where we are in the story. Enjoy!


RE MIX

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F5-T3nPBG3Y

Direct download: episode43_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This weeks episode is a call back to a popular mythic origins episode we did some time ago. This time, we discuss three different summons/aeons/espers/gfs than previously. We also answer some excellent questions via our question segment. We talk about Final Fantasys evolution of summons, and how we find Final Fantasy X's system to be the perfect balance. We also talk about the popular online video Sakaguchi's Final Fantasy by youtuber Mega64. Enjoy!

 

Direct download: UFF_episode42_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

Ever wondered what would happen if we tried talking about more than just Final Fantasy?

Well, now you can find out!

Join Joe, Kaleb, Kaleb, and Dylan as they discuss news from the Video Game Industry, and argue over the use of the word "classic".

Direct download: nudeclan.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:49am MST

Join us, as we dive into a popular online theory where Necron is the Iifa tree enemy Soulcage. We discuss how legitimate the theory is, and find it acceptable and an interesting idea. Sqaure has not denied the theory, so we find it highly believable. We also catch up a bit on the other segments of the show, and discuss the Final Fantasy XV fauna trailer. Remix: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sawmOwoL5Dw

Direct download: UFF_Necron_Theory_mixdown.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

  • Final Fantasy XV Is 60 Percent Finished

  • The new Gold Saucer will bring chocobo racing from Final Fantasy VII, Triple Triad from Final Fantasy VIII, and a bunch of other mini-games and activities. Final Fantasy XIV patch 2.51 is due out next week, on 24 February.

  • During camping, players will be able to have their party eat meals cooked by Ignis, the driver and chef of the group. Eating will give status buffs and other effects to aid in the party's travels.

  • 'Final Fantasy Type-0 HD' Gets Rather Bleak In New Trailer

  • What you may have noticed about the video, which was from the recent Active Time Report Page 4.0 broadcast, is that its somewhat choppy in places and seems to jitter and jumper a bit. Well the game’s director, Hajime Tabata, has since mentioned that the demo build of the game won’t reach 1080p and won’t even be running at 30 frames per second.

  • you'll be able to save and load your progress.

  • As reported by Nova Crystallis, Square Enix announced at the Taipei Game Show over the weekend it has partnered up with XPEC. XPEC is a Taiwanese company that will help finish off developing Final Fantasy XV.

  • Final Fantasy XV director, Hajime Tabata, said it was important to collaborate with XPEC. He described the game as a “large scale project” and it was necessary to have XPEC there to help them finish off its development.

  • XPEC themselves explained it was an honor to work on a project like Final Fantasy XV. They said most of the staff are big fans of the Final Fantasy series. XPEC were responsible for working on the train station level that was revealed over the weekend. They couldn’t show much footage though as they are heavily involved with the second half of the game.

  • Honors to the best games of 2014 won’t be the only thing handed out at the 15th Annual Game Developers Choice Awards on Wednesday, March 4 in San Francisco, with Final Fantasy Creator Hironobu Sakaguchi set to receive the Lifetime Achievement Award for his contributions to the world of gaming.Meggan Scavio, General Manager of all GDC events, talked about Sakaguchi:

  • Over his illustrious and thriving career, Sakaguchi-san has established some of the most successful entertainment franchises of all time, and helped cement the RPG genre in Japan and around the world. But the gaming world owes an even greater debt to Sakaguchi-san and team for making a compelling game narrative as important to game development as its graphics and sound.

  • Final Fantasy helped pave the way for game stories that dealt with death, regret and character development in a mature and significant way, and we’re proud to honor Sakaguchi-san as a true leader in the space, and an inspired game developer.

  • During a livestream from the Tokaigi Japan Game Party, Producer and Director Naoki Yoshida appeared to tease an upcoming Xbox One port of the game by holding up an Xbox One controller. While of the course the controller is compatible with the PC version of the game, it was never used during the demonstration. Additionally, Yoshida-san has previously explained that while Square Enix was ready to work on an Xbox One version of the game, it would only do so once Microsoft allowed cross-platform gameplay. He even went so far as mentioning the possibility of having servers with only Windows and Xbox One gamers. With Microsoft recently announcing cross-platform play, perhaps this is the sign that we will soon hear about FF XIV’s Xbox One release.

 

Tactics:

Here are a few quick pointers for racing the Chocobo Trainer on its highest difficulty:

 

If you are trying to get the sun sigil, you will need to finish this race with a time UNDER 0.0 seconds. I have had a race time that finished at exactly 0.0 seconds and I only won a shitty item. In order to achieve this time you need to shoot to get between 12 and 15 balloons, while only getting hit once or twice if you are fast enough to the finish. It's very difficult but these tips will help you. And remember, use the DPad, it makes maneuvering your chocobo a little easier. Also remember that if you run into an invisible "wall" it will cause your chocobo to make a hard turn back on course. This is sometimes useful when you need a quick dodge.

 

The first ramp like area will try and trick you into thinking you can pickup a balloon or two by moving left. DONT do it! This will cause the trainer to move ahead of you and you won't get a single balloon. Instead stay right, as your goal is to gather a couple balloons and be in front of the trainer as you round the corner.

 

Being ahead of the trainer as you round the corner will cause most of the birds to target the trainer. This helps free you up to gather more balloons without the risk of getting hit yourself. It is very important that you attempt to stay to the right as much as possible, as moving more to the center or left will cause the birds to start targeting you. It is also important to note that while there are some sets of birds that target the trainer while you are in the lead, some will aim for you regardless. These usually give you enough time to dodge them if you are paying attention.

 

During the second turn, try to stay to the right as you head into the final leg of the race. This last stretch is where a bit of luck comes in as the birds are a little more unpredictable. If you stay the right you will have a better chance of avoiding the birds, but the balloons are scattered all over the place. Only make very calculated attempts at collecting balloons in this last area as you can be hit multiole times in a matter of seconds and end a promising run.

 

A last bit of advice, if there are a few balloons in a row at the very end of the race on the left hand side, you can attempt to collect them as the birds don't always have the time to fly into this area. It can be dangerous getting over here so only do it is you need that last balloon or two to get your target time.

 

Good Luck!

 

Remix:

FFIX - Final Battle (Necrons Theme) - Remake #133

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1vSWQf7dL3c

Direct download: necron.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

Crimsoncommand

I was recently playing FFIX with my brother and thought that it was really odd on how many child characters there were. Honestly, it seems that every child character besides Rydia and Vivi just diminishes the story. To me they are annoying. I'm wondering if anyone else feels this way or what your thoughts are about age and playable characters?

 

Banedrom

Long time listener, first time question asker.



I started out on Final Fantasy VI with friends before graduating to the PS games. When Final Fantasy VIII came out, it was a graphical dream. Character design was getting more and more realistic. Then I saw the first new about Final Fantasy IX in video game magazines and was a bit disappointed. . Steiner with his frighteningly feminine eyes. And what was Quina anyways?



Some see the character design of Final Fantasy IX as a hiccup in the more realistic design since Final Fantasy VIII. Was this a welcome vacation from reality or a disappointment for you guys?

 

Shinru

What were your favorite dungeons and bosses in the game?

Which bosses and dungeons did you find the hardest?

 

What are your thoughts on the final bosses and final dungeon area?

 

What about the music for the final bosses, did you like it?

Did you notice that the Kuja's last boss battle had Nobuo Uematsu get inspired by Black Sabbath's Iron Man song?

Did you fight any of the secret bosses like the Tantarian, Hades or Ozma? Hehe Hades was a lot of fun to discover by accident in the final dungeon.

Ozma is insane though.

 

I enjoyed the trek through the final dungeon area, having to fight a certain amount of classic FF bosses up to the next checkpoint and I really liked the environments.

 

Necron was insane the first time I fought him, that Grand Cross attack is scary with all those status ailments. I would grip my controller in fear every time he did that attack.

A lot of people say Necron was random but he was hinted at a few times in the game if you read the writing on the dungeon walls talking about the god of death. The game does deal with the themes of life and rebirth and death so I never felt that it was weird to have Necron as a final boss. Plus FF9 was paying tribute to past FF games and we all know how FF3, FF4 and FF5 had random final bosses appear out of nowhere so it was trying to recreate that again.

 

How did you guys do against him and what was your final party? Where you doing 9999 Damage with Steiner?

 

Banedrom

I know that this is a commonly debated concept from FFIX, but Kuja is a character that really pushes the gender roles. When I first played this game, I thought to myself that was a weird looking female character. Eventually, I was more and more confused as they dialogue indicated that Kuja was in fact a male character. What are your thoughts on Kuja as a "David Bowie as Goblin King - esque" androgynous villain?

 

Void

Final Fantasy IX is, in many ways, a throwback to the older Final Fantasy games.  What did you think about the old school style and throwbacks in the game?

 

Void

The Active Time Events are a really cool way to get to know the characters in Final Fantasy IX.

 

What did you guys think of them?  Did you feel that they're an effective way of fleshing out characters?

 

Void

I love FFIX, it's my favorite Final Fantasy game.  But my major complaint about the game is how slow the battle system is.  Not only is the game slow to load into every battle, but a lot of time is spent waiting for ATB gauges to fill up or watching needlessly long attack animations.

 

It is, by far, the thing I dislike most about Final Fantasy IX.

 

So, two questions:

 

Did the slowness of the battle system in FFIX drive you crazy by the end of the game?

 

If that wasn't your biggest complaint about the game (and I don't know how it couldn't be) what is?

Direct download: ffix2.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

Final Fantasy IX began development shortly before the release of Final Fantasy VIII.

 

A small glimpse into the early process of the game was revealed on the internet by Sakaguchi in 2010.

 

On Mistwalker’s blog (Sakaguchi’s company), Sakaguchi posted early notes for the opening of Final Fantasy IX. Although the blog post is now impossible to find, an amature translation was jotted down in a forum deep inside the internet:

 

This is probably the biggest glimpse we’ll ever get into the process of the making of any of these games:

 

The game’s title and then fade to black.

 

-Movie 1-

 

Light emerges as the camera glides over an ocean following a landscape of trees, rivers, and fountains. The sky nears sunset as the camera moves onto the surface of a light fog and behind an airship called the Utsutsu. A large shadow approaches from behind revealing the Theatre ship.

 

-Darkness-

 

Loud rings of machinery fill the area. A dark figure walks forward curiously.

 

The player makes an input for the character’s name. The default name is Zidane.

 

*Scratch*

 

The protagonist Zidane lights a match brightening the room with a dim glow. (The match can be moved without the risk of the flame extinguishing, but it will go out in a short period of time. Ignite the match quickly and light the lamp at the center of the room.)

 

The lamp brightens the room completely revealing an arrangement of strangely shaped vases and boxes crawling on the pipe wall at the end of the room.

 

This is the cargo bay area of an airship.

 

“Don!”

 

Three thieves walk in when the player opens the door. One of them jokingly asks Zidane for an autograph. The player can respond to it.

 

Thieves: “Zidane, a Hayakatta.”

 

Zidane: “What happened to the boss?”

 

At that moment, footsteps sound from the ascending staircase. Zidane and the thieves turn towards the interruption.

 

“Achoo!” The sneeze sounds boss lol.

 

Thieves: “Boss!”

 

A tall rotund man with a thick beard steps down from the staircase. He runs toward the gang of thieves and the battle transitions to the battle screen.

 

-Boss Battle- Boss

 

Sometime during the fight; “Oh, you guys are pretty good,” “I like it!” says the Boss. After a certain amount of damage is dealt, Boss leans over weak and says “That’s enough for today.” (Toitaro???)

 

Inside the airship (continued)

 

Boss: “Ha ha ha,… Nice shot as usual.” (“I’ll ask today.” Almost loud, Zidane nodded???)

 

“Everyone, gather around!”

 

The screen fades and transitions to Zidane and the thieves gathered around a table with a map spread across it. Boss sitting at the head of the table, initiates the meeting revealing a plan to kidnap a princess during a play held on a theatre ship.

 

The screens transitions to the play. The first act has just ended at a pulling scene and the audience stands up with applause as the lights dim and the curtain closes. The stage director steps forward and informs the audience that there will be a short intermission before the second act begins. At the balcony sits the queen and her daughter Princess Garnet. The knight standing beside Garnet, asks her and the queen if they would like some more tea. The queen answers yes and insists her daughter to have some.

 

The knight fixes the tea and slips a drug into Garnet’s cup. He hands the cups to them and watches carefully when Garnet takes a sip.

She yawns a couple of minutes later after a few more sips. About a minute later another knight walks in from behind carrying a present. The knight that fixed the tea takes the package and presents it to the queen.

 

“A gift to you, from the theatre,” he says.

 

The queen hurries to open the lid and a dozen of oglops jump out. The queen jumps out of her seat panicking. The other guards hurry to her aid. With this distraction no notices that Garnet has fallen asleep and that the knight has run off with her.

 

Inside the airship (continued)

 

Boss: “Hmm, perfect.”

 

Thief: “It’s a brilliant plan.”

 

Thief 2: “This is very rich--!” (or maybe “This will make us rich!” ???)

 (Pose to pose a big jump in one of the robbers.

  Vibration, the model falls theater airships.

 

Sakaguchi’s notes for movie 4:

Close up of Princess Garnet Close up of her breasts. View of her breasts inside the clothes (a little). Also a view of her pendant of royalty....  

-Hallway- She rushes away from the hallway. Two stare at each other.

Zidane: “Hey, was that..”

Thief: “Her breasts look comfortable..”

Zidane: “No, no, she was wearing the pendant of the summons permitted by only royalty.”

Thief: “I fell in Love at first sight..”

Zidane: “Deep blue stone… “The Legend of Leviathan”, was it Princess Garnet?”

Thief: “What are you talking about?”

Zidane: “Never mind, change of plan, let’s follow after her”.

 

Final Fantasy IX would be the last Final Fantasy on the Playstation, and as the series planned to move on into the next generation, it was 9 that was left to fittingly end the single-digit series of Final Fantasy games.

 

Here’s a little excerpt form a Famitsu interview with The Gutch.

 

Sakaguchi:  I was thinking [of] it as an end. FF10 and FF11 are going to be on PS2 as well as PlayOnline. So with those, we were wanting to concentrate less on the feel of a world but more to use visuals which would push the hardware's ability. In that sense, because FF9 is the third in the series on PlayStation, instead of making it by pushing the abilities of the present hardware, we thought of making the feel of a Final Fantasy world once more...

 

Interviewer: In the previous interview, it was explained that it [FF] was going back to its roots. And when you look at the logo, the crystal is there. It really is going back to the roots of the FF series. Why is that?

 

Sakaguchi: Well, I wanted to try it out. (laughs) I said that it was because it was the last single numbered FF, but, yes, I like the number 9...(laughs)

 

Sakaguchi served as producer of the game (with Shinji Hashimoto), and was the scenario writer for this “send-off”. It was not originally planned to be a main line final fantasy game, and had been given the title “Final Fantasy Gaiden” during the conceptual stages of the game. It wasn’t officially announced as Final Fantasy IX until late in 1999 when Final Fantasy IX, X, and XI were announced simultaneously.

 

As a return to the fantasy genre that began the series, Final Fantasy 9 may not seem like the natural sequel to FF6, 7, or 8. The most notable difference is of course the controversial design and look of the game. Anime, realism, and steampunk gave way to old castles and more of a western fantasy approach. Hiroyuki Ito stated that they pulled from Norse and Nothern European Mythology, and to cap off the retro feel, there were some nice deformed character models to match the pre-FF8 Final Fantasy games.

 

Hideo Minaba: Art Director:As this is the last single-digit Final Fantasy, we wanted to give the feeling of a series watershed, a sort of grand collection of what has come before.

 

This old fantasy feel, not only affected the look of the game, but also the soundtrack as scored by Nobuo Uematsu. “I was shooting for subtle, classical-sounding tunes that fit the general setting and feel of the game…” he states, although he did start to steer clear of that feel. This departure and “boredom” with the sound he was originally going for may have to do with the 160 tracks he recorded for the game. The game ended up using around 140, including some remixes of other FF Soundtracks.

 

Uematsu: I wanted to remix some of the older songs. Some of the character and location names were the same, so I thought that it would cool to use something from the past series.

 

Some staff for Final Fantasy IX were returning from other Final Fantasy games. However as Yoshinori Kitase (Dir. FF7 and FF8), was moving onto FFX, the directing duties, as well as battle design duties, were put onto the shoulders of Hiroyuki Ito. Ito took much of the staff of Final Fantasy Tactics to work on the game. And as the game was mostly created in Hawaii (possibly due to Sakaguchi’s involvement with both FF9 and Spirits Within), many of the staff members were not Japanese. Yet another reason the game has more of a “western” sensibility.

 

Many take umbridge in the speed of the battle system of Final Fantasy IX: At one time designed to be the fastest battle system in the series, yet turned out to be the slowest. The reason for this, apparently (according to a superfan, Alex Donaldson, that was interviewed on the podcast “My Favourite Game”), was that the system couldn’t handle the battle system, and the framerate wouldn’t be acceptable at that speed. Sakaguchi said, with the speed down, the game almost feels like turned based. *personally, I think he’s talking out of his ass.

 

Despite the slow system, which we’ll talk about plenty in this episode, Final Fantasy IX was still a success.

 

Delayed to avoid conflict with the release of Enix’s Dragon Quest, the game was released on July 7th, 2000 in Japan, and made it to North America on November 13th. A couple months later, Europe got it February 2001.

 

The game didn’t sell as well as the previous 2 entries in the series, but it was still a hit. ultimately selling 5.3 Million copies by 2003.

 

Its legacy now is a quiet one. It’s never had a sequel, it was the smallest release on the Playstation, and was released when the PS2 had already arrived on store shelves. Many gamers, perhaps unfamiliar with the roots of the series, were turned off by the art design. Perhaps something as simple as a logo not designed by Yoshitaka Amano could throw someone off.

 

But alas, the game was still critically acclaimed, receiving many accolades at the playstation awards, and having very positive reviews from multiple gaming publications. As it now stands, Final Fantasy IX has the highest Metacritic score of any Final Fantasy.

 

If anything, there’s at least one person who thinks the game a bigger success than 7 or 8....

 

IGN interview with The Gutch:

 

Sakaguchi: The upcoming Final Fantasy IX. This title (currently under development) is based on a reflection of all the previous works in the series. The coming installment is my "favorite," it's closest to my ideal view of what Final Fantasy should be.

 

Remixes:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2wdaJV3myBc

 

"Rose of May" from Final Fantasy IX (acoustic guitar solo)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BzWSYy2aqQo

 

Final Fantasy IX - You're Not Alone! (Vose Dubstep Remix)

Direct download: ffix1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

Join us as we discuss the Final Fantasy VIII theory in which Rinoa becomes Ultimecia in the future! We discuss our thoughts on the theory, as well as read a statement from Square Enix themselves on the matter. We also catch up on past segments, including the beloved questions segment. Enjoy!!

Remix:
Succession of Witches - Final Fantasy VIII - Heavy Metal Guitar Cover
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9vXcVkXsYQU

 

Direct download: rinoaisultimecia2.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

This episode, we discuss the popular internet theory involving Squall, our fearless leader of Final Fantasy VIII, dying at the end of disc one. We discuss the theories strong points, and also its not so strong ones. We assess the theory, and also a rebuttal we found online, and reveal which opinion we side with, and why! 

Direct download: Squallsdead.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:28pm MST

Game Chapters:

Fire Cavern

SeeD Field Exam

SeeD Inauguration

First Mission

Timber TV Station

Galbadia Garden

Tomb of the Unknown King

Assassination

Galbadia D-District Prison

Galbadia Missile Base

Secret of Balamb Garden

Fishermans Horizon

Occupied Balamb

Trabia Garden

Clash of the Gardens

White SeeD Ship

Esthar

Lunatic Pandora

Rinoa

Time Compression

The Future

Ultimecia Castle

 

Story

 

Gameplay

 

Music

 

Legacy

8.15 million copies, 3rd largest ff game

 

Ranking







Questions:

 

VOID

In my last playthrough of FFVIII I only summoned a GF once in the entire game.  I found it much easier to just optimize the Junction system and ignore summoning GFs while in battle.

 

So, I have two questions for you:

 

Did you find yourself using the GF command often in battle?

 

Who was your favorite GF?

 

Shinru:

We seriously need more FF final dungeons to be like this.

 

FF3 had an epic final dungeon as you guys know *laughs*

FF5 had a great final dungeon area, lots of bosses and it felt like a real journey to The Void

FF6 was pretty atmospheric

FF7 was atmospheric and felt like a trek to the Lifestream part of the planet's core

 

Then we have FF8 which was a arguably one of the best. Maybe not as loved or iconic as say FF7's final dungeon but FF8 really nailed it for the final dungeon area.

 

Great music

puzzles, exploration, rooms and unique enemies and bosses

exciting final boss

 

All made for a great dungeon.

 

What are your thoughts on the final dungeon of FF8 and do you think it is one of the best in the FF series?

Would you like to see a return for more final dungeons like this in future games?

 

VOID:
After completing the game, how do you feel about the junction system?

 

Did you guys break it in any of the ways that you can or did you try to play the game without abusing it?

 

VOID:

In most Final Fantasy games there tend to be parts that really suck me in and keep me playing.  The pacing is just perfect and inspires me to continually make progress.  There are also parts of each game that seem to drag on much longer than they should.  These are parts that often cause me to lose my momentum or put the game down for days at a time.

 

In your playthrough of FFVIII which sections of the game do you think were the best paced and which were the worst paced?








Shinru FF8 Review:

First off let just get what is wrong with the game out of the way first.

 

The battle system, drawing system, junction system, magic and enemies levelling up with you in the game.

Maybe if they worked on it more it could have been better but what we got wasn't that good.

 

I basically played the game and never even went over level 20 with Squall.

drawing magic early on is a chore, magic is ruined because you never want to use it and waste it.

junction magic and re arranging it becomes tedious especially if you switch party members.

The battle system can easily be broken, basically I got the Lionheart and kept Squall always low health and would press the circle button constantly until his limit break would trigger and then I would just kill basically every boss in either 1-3 turns of repeating this.

 

Also the card game is really hard once rules change and unless you look up guides you don't really know what you are doing and it makes for a very annoying experience.

 

Now for the good.

 

that Siren summon :)

Zell is awesome.

Laguna is awesome.

Quistis is hot.

Rinoa is beautiful.

Squall is fun for some angsty teens to relate with... and he creates a language out of just using ellipsis to speak lol. Now one thing I enjoy is that he progresses as a character and once he really gets his act together thanks to Rinoa he changes and becomes a better person. I really liked that character development.

 

As far as the story goes I really like the idea of "time travel and outer space witches in a scifi world"

 

Ragnarok is the coolest airship ever to be in an FF game I think.

 

Find Your Way is a great creepy and eerie song.

 

Mashing square during summons is fun because you finally get something to do during summons, although they are way too long in this game. I did enjoy the idea though.

 

I enjoyed the game's "romance" theme and I know lots of fans like myself like the game because of it.

That Waltz for the Moon balroom dance scene was fun and even the part in outer space where Squall has to catch Rinoa is great.

 

And yes even the ending when Eyes on Me plays is fun. I actually like the song unlike some people :P

 

Overall I enjoyed the game but its the weakest of the PS1 FF games, FF7 and FF9 are much better.

Direct download: 34_ff8p2.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

 

Final Fantasy VIII

 

Final Fantasy VIII was released for the PlayStation in 1999; February 11th in Japan, September 9th for North America, and October 27th for Europe.The game arrived on PC for Windows in 2000. It has also been available in the PlayStation Network since 2009. The game was developed and published by Square.

Final Fantasy VIII’s development began in 1997, while Square was working on the English localization of Final Fantasy VII. The beloved and treasured Hironobu “The Gutch” Sakaguchi served as the games executive producer, while primarily working on his own demise; which takes the form of 2001’s Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within. This lent the position of director for the game to Yoshinori Kitase. The battle system for Final Fantasy VIII was designed by Kitase and none other than Hiroyuki Ito.

For the visual design, Kitase knew he wanted a combination of fantasy and realism. He aimed to create a cast of characters who appeared to be ordinary people. Tetsuya Nomura and art director Yusuke Naora worked tirelessly to achieve this feel by creating realistically proportioned characters. Naora also attempted to enhance realism by bright lighting effects while creating appropriate shadows. They also used motion capture technology to give the games characters more lifelike movements in the FMV sequences.

The designers felt compelled to invert the atmosphere of the previous games, which were themed as light emerging from darkness. This decision was easy for the team, since they almost all worked on Final Fantasy VII, and felt a new direction was a good idea. The world designs were improved from the last title, due to the experience the team had working within their graphical boundaries. Another part of the “realism” theme that Kitase so desired, was noted with the realistically inspired architecture for the areas. This is noted with the Ancient Egyptian and Greek architecture. We also see a nod to Paris, while throwing a super high tech city in the mix to give it a different, futuristic feeling as well.

In an attempt to maintain a foreign atmosphere, the characters designs were predominantly European in appearance. The first Final Fantasy VIII character to be developed was Squall. Nomura gave squall a fur jacket as a challenge to the games FMV designers. Thankfully, they accepted the challenge, and the jacket looks super realistic. Even if it seems slightly out of place… Nomura also found a place for some previously designed characters, such as Edea, Fujin, and Raijin. Nomura designed Edea based on the style of Yoshitaka Amano.

Final Fantasy VIII also featured the series’ first lyrics based song. This took the form of Eyes on Me, by Faye Wong.

 

The game received positive reviews, and was also commercially successful. In just two days after the North American release, Final Fantasy VIII became the top selling video game in the US, and would remain in that spot for over two weeks. As of March 31, 2003 the game had shipped 8.15 million copies worldwide. This was the fastest selling Final Fantasy title at the time.

Remix:

BENZYH - Find Your Way (Final Fantasy VIII) (Nobuo Uematsu) REMIX
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4X8BUtPK3g

Direct download: 33_ff8p1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

News:

 

Final Fantasy Explorers:

According to Siliconera, Japanese Amazon reviews on the new monster-hunter-like Final Fantasy game note that although people liked the game, most were expecting something MORE similar to Monster Hunter. Insead, there were many complaints that there was too much walking in the game, being compared to Final Fantasy XI. There has been talk of a patch to address these problems, but nothing has been confirmed as of yet.

 

Final Fantasy XIV:

The last patch of the current patch cycle for the game, before the release of Heavensward, patch 2.5 entitled “Before the Fall”, is not only an ominous title, but also a patch of epic proportions. This is what we know about the patch according to Square Enix:

 

“Part one of Before the Fall is scheduled for the mid to end of January with the release of patch 2.5, which contains myriad challenges for adventurers of every persuasion. The patch will include roughly two-thirds of the final main scenario quests, three new dungeons, and the conclusion of the Crystal Tower questline and the World of Darkness. The patch will also feature the adventures of Hildibrand─agent of enquiry, inspector extraordinaire─on his latest (and perhaps final?) investigation, a new battle against Odin, the Dark Divinity of legend, in Urth’s Fount, new gear for gatherers and crafters, numerous new recipes, and more. We have plenty planned to make this patch a befitting prelude to the end of the 2.X storyline.

 

There will be much to do in patch 2.5, and before we bombard you with more in part 2, we’ll be offering players a change of pace with patch 2.51, which focuses on the introduction of the Gold Saucer. It bears mentioning, however, that the establishment is known as the Manderville Gold Saucer in Eorzea. You’ll have to check it out for yourself to figure out where this moniker came from. Including chocobo racing, chocobo breeding, and the return of the FF card game Triple Triad, you can look forward to a fun and relaxing time in the Gold Saucer.

 

Part two of Before the Fall is scheduled for the end of March, closing the curtain on the story that brought about the rebirth of Eorzea. What trials and tribulations await the Warrior of Light? What drastic turn of events will grant passage to the reclusive nation of Ishgard? Only time will tell.”

 

Final Fantasy XV:

 

According to gameranx:

Final Fantasy 15 lead game designer Wan Hazmer shared some new details regarding the game in a panel named The History and Future of Final Fantasy. We'll pass over details mentioned before and discuss what they revealed here that's new.

Wan stressed the importance of camping periodically. Basically, camping is when you have an opportunity to power your self up, using food you can prepare using different ingredients. These effects gradually decrease in time, giving you incentive to camp again. Also an incentive to camp is experience. While you earn experience throughout the game, you can only 'cash in' that experience and level up at camp.

The game will now have a 60 minute day/night cycle. 40 minutes of that will be daytime, and 20 minutes night. The doubling of a day from 30 to 60 minutes implies there are some tasks that will take you a considerable amount of time to accomplish.

Final Fantasy XV:

As per the recent interview between Famitsu and Hajime Tabata:

They’re trying to make a more realistic feel to the games dimensions. They based the town we saw in the most recent trailer on the people and design of the Bahamas. We will be able to talk to NPC’s, and they will react accordingly to a prince in their presence. Boob jiggle for Cid used to be insane, but is being altered.

 

And the Categories are…

For All

Best Final Fantasy Podcast

   -Aetheryte Radio

   -ARRpod

   -Damn Chocobo

   -Final Fantasy Union

   -Limit Break Radio

   -Ultima Final Fantasy

Best 2014 Final Fantasy Release

   -Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII

   -Final Fantasy Agito

   -Final Fantasy Artniks Drive

   -Theatrhythm Final Fantasy: Curtain Call

   -Final Fantasy Explorers

   -Final Fantasy: World Wide Words

   -Final Fantasy VII G-Bike

 

For the Show

Best UFF Episode

Worst Episode (minisodes and commentaries don't count)

Best Rant

Best Impersonation (celebrity or otherwise)

Best Song (remixes before the discussions don't count)

 

Remix:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e5dWEI0LrFw

FF10 - Someday The Dream Will End (Folk/Medieval Remix) by Exsanquis

Direct download: bestof14.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am MST

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